Tuesday, March 31, 2015

E-I-E-I-O

In my first book, Running Shorts: A Collection of  Stories and Advice for Antone Who Has Ever Laced Up a Pair of Running Shoes, I penned a chapter entitled, 'E-I-E-I-O, in which I described some of my animal encounters along the roads over the years.

A friend sent me this picture today, and I'm happy to say that this is one encounter I'm very glad I've never had!


A LULU OF AN APRIL FOOL

April Fool's Day is tomorrow, and with an 'Alberta Clipper' poised to dump more snow, I'm hoping the weather gods are pulling a prank on us.

My publisher, Lulu, www.lulu.com, has a great sale going on for the next two days, and they're NOT joking. From now until April 2, Lulu is offering 25% off all print books, AND 50% off shipping.

Lulu has published both my books about running. They are books written by a veteran runner, for runners.

The cool thing about having written two books about running is that they are two contrasting works.

My first book, Running Shorts: A Collection of Stories and Advice for Anyone Who Has Ever Laced Up a Pair of Running Shoes, published in 2011, is a compilation of my experiences as competitive runner for 39 years, but many of these tales reflect experiences YOU have had during your years as a runner. As one of the Amazon reviewers stated, "It will make you laugh and it will make you cry."

Traveling the country, promoting my first book, prompted me to write, Personal Best, my second book, published in September 2014.

Runners told me what they wanted in a running book, and I tried to respond by writing a book that is instructive to runners of all ages and abilities.

Personal Best took a tragic turn in April 2013, soon after I crossed the finish line at the Boston Marathon. I devoted my first chapter, entitled "Was That Thunder," to the events, and my experiences of that day. I guarantee you, it is worth the read, and it is my fervent hope that I was able to capture the emotions of that fateful day in a manner in which every runner can relate.

If you would like read an electronic version of Personal Best, it is available for only $2.99 at Amazon, Lulu, iBooks, Nook, and Kobo.

You can visit my website: www,muldowneyrunning.com, and I will personally sign and send a book to you. You can go to Amazon, Barnes and Noble, or take advantage of the sale at Lulu, to purchase running books that will positively influence your future running efforts.

And, it doesn't end there!

Read the books and stay in touch. email me here, look me up on Facebook at: Joe Muldowney Running, or on Twitter at: rdrunnr00. Tell me about your running, ask me questions, discuss training or injury issues.

I love this sport, and I love runners.

Let's get to the finish line together.

Monday, March 30, 2015

1099-IT'S MORE THAN A TAX FORM

Before the income tax deadline of April 15, you can visit my website: www,muldowneyrunning.com, and I will personally sign and send a copy of my latest book, Personal Best, to you. Currently, both of my books are on sale for $10.99 (not the tax form), plus shipping and handling. You can also go to Amazon, Barnes and Noble, to purchase running books that will positively influence your future running efforts.

Recently, I checked my author page on Amazon, amazon.com/author/joemuldowney  and I was happy and humbled to read the following words from John M,

4.0 out of 5 stars very inspirationalMarch 8, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Personal Best (Kindle Edition)
Coming back from an injury that sidelined me over the fall and winter, Joe reminds me what started my running career. Thanks, Joe!

I don't know John M., but, upon reading his review, it reaffirmed my reasons for writing Personal Best. By reading Personal Best, you will receive great running advice, tips on training, yes, some inspiration. And if you purchase an electronic version of my latest book, Personal Best, will cost you less than a popular running magazine, without the advertisements!

My first book, Running Shorts: A Collection of Stories and Advice for Anyone Who Has Ever Laced Up a Pair of Running Shoes, published in 2011, is a compilation of my experiences as competitive runner for 39 years, but many of these tales reflect experiences YOU have had during your years as a runner. As one of the Amazon reviewers stated, "It will make you laugh and it will make you cry."

Traveling the country, promoting my first book, prompted me to write, Personal Best, my second book, published in September 2014.

Runners told me what they wanted in a running book, and I tried to respond by writing a book that is instructive to runners of all ages and abilities.

Personal Best took a tragic turn in April 2013, soon after I crossed the finish line at the Boston Marathon. I devoted my first chapter, entitled "Was That Thunder," to the events, and my experiences of that day. I guarantee you, it is worth the read, and it is my fervent hope that I was able to capture the emotions of that fateful day in a manner in which every runner can relate.

If you would like read an electronic version of Personal Best, it is available for only $2.99 at Amazon, Lulu, iBooks, Nook, and Kobo.

Read the books and stay in touch. email me here, look me up on Facebook at: Joe Muldowney Running, or on Twitter at: rdrunnr00. Tell me about your running, ask me questions, discuss training or injury issues.

I love this sport, and I love runners.

If one word of what you read in this blog or in one of my books makes you a better runner, or makes you feel better about running,then I feel I've paid it forward, and that's as satisfying as winning any race.


Sunday, March 29, 2015

RUNNING AND ONIONS

Another Arctic blast gripped our region yesterday. When I left for my run, the temperature read a very January-like 29 degrees. In the morning, a light blanket of ground covered the ground.

After five months of snow, and with April around the corner, it is my fondest hope that yesterday's dusting was our "onion snow."

Chances are, if you or your relatives are not from around these parts, you have no idea what I'm talking about.

After William Penn and the Quakers settled Pennsylvania in the late 1600s, Penn actually advertised his colony in Europe. The similar climate, terrain, and growing season appealed particularly to the Germans, who brought their efficient methods of farming to the hills of Pennsylvania.

Mistakenly called the "Pennsylvania Dutch," when they told the English settlers they hailed from Deutschland, they planted their early crops in March. One of the first crops to enter the ground was the onion crop. Hence, early-Spring snow has earned the moniker, "onion snow."

Now, I don't possess the farming skills of the Pennsylvania Dutch, (although my mother boasts German heritage), I usually try to plant onions in my garden around Saint Patrick's Day.

Not this year!

Today I ran my best five-mile workout since October. The temperature, only in the low 40s, was boosted by intense sunshine, and the sky took on a periwinkle blue hue. It was a great day to work outside, cleaning up winter's mess. I decided to prepare my garden for what I hoped would be an insertion of lettuce, broccoli, cauliflower, and, of course, spring onions, later this week. As I swung the pick into the ground, the point stuck, gripped by an icy claw. To my dismay, the ground is still frozen, so the onions will have to wait.


However, temperatures have begun to moderate, and for runners, the next few weeks should bring ideal training and racing temperatures before the summer heat descends upon us.

Take advantage of the April and May days of spring. As life renews itself around us, renew your commitment to training. Snow, ice, and frozen temperatures are gone or a while, and we've once again survived winter's wrath.

The onions may have to wait, but running season is in full bloom.




Friday, March 27, 2015

SUPPORT THE FUTURE OF OUR SPORT

This week, despite frigid temperatures, the high school track and field season began here in northeastern Pennsylvania. Athletes have been practicing for about three weeks, but snowy and icy conditions forced most teams indoors, so when the first meets were contested on Tuesday, they were little more than intense workouts, means of allowing coaches to gauge their talent pool.

Track and field ranks as the world's oldest sport. The ancient Greeks held games at the base of Mount Olympus as a means of honoring the gods they believed resided there. Sprint races, javelin and discus throwing were some of the events we contest in our track and field meets, some 2700 years later.

From lithe distance runners to burly shot put hurlers, a track meet is like a three-ring circus, featuring sprints, hurdles, horizontal and vertical jumps, distance races, and throwing events.

And unlike many other sports, there's no subjective evaluation in track and field. No one can argue that, "He's a better hitter," or "She's a better 3-point shooter." If you run faster, jump higher, or throw farther, you are, statistically, the best.

Track and field athletes work very hard to perfect their crafts, but since it is not a "money generating" sport, it is often ignored or poorly funded. With the exception of the University of Oregon, few stadiums are filled for track meets.

This spring, make it a point to attend a track and field meet. Support the young men and women who do what you do. Encourage the distance runners to train year-round.

They may be high school students, but they are the future of our sport, of which there is no retirement age.

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

SPRING TRAINING MANUAL


Spring has arrived, and it's time refine our goals for the new racing season.

How are you going to improve your running and racing this year?

Have you figured how you're going to remain vertical on the tightrope without falling off?

That is, how you're going to run your fastest times without getting injured?

Or, perhaps you're coming back from an injury and you need some inspiration.

Believe me, I've been there, so I feel your pain.

Here's a guarantee I'll make to you.

If you want to receive some great running advice and tips on training, an electronic version of my latest book, Personal Best, will cost you less than a popular running magazine, without the advertisements!

My first book, Running Shorts: A Collection of Stories and Advice for Anyone Who Has Ever Laced Up a Pair of Running Shoes, published in 2011, is a compilation of my experiences as competitive runner for 39 years, but many of these tales reflect experiences YOU have had during your years as a runner. As one of the Amazon reviewers stated, "It will make you laugh and it will make you cry."

Traveling the country, promoting my first book, prompted me to write, Personal Best, my second book, published in September 2014.

Runners told me what they wanted in a running book, and I tried to respond by writing a book that is instructive to runners of all ages and abilities.

Personal Best took a tragic turn in April 2013, soon after I crossed the finish line at the Boston Marathon. I devoted my first chapter, entitled "Was That Thunder," to the events, and my experiences of that day. I guarantee you, it is worth the read, and it is my fervent hope that I was able to capture the emotions of that fateful day in a manner in which every runner can relate.

If you would like read an electronic version of Personal Best, it is available for only $2.99 at Amazon, Lulu, iBooks, Nook, and Kobo.

You can visit my website: www,muldowneyrunning.com, and I will personally sign and send a book to you. Currently, both books are on sale for $11.99, plus shipping and handling. You can also go to Amazon, Barnes and Noble, to purchase running books that will positively influence your future running efforts.

And, it doesn't end there!

Read the books and stay in touch. email me here, look me up on Facebook at: Joe Muldowney Running, or on Twitter at: rdrunnr00. Tell me about your running, ask me questions, discuss training or injury issues.

I love this sport, and I love runners.

If one word of what you read in this blog or in one of my books makes you a better runner, or makes you feel better about running,then I feel I've paid it forward, and that's as satisfying as winning any race.

amazon.com/author/joemuldowney


Tuesday, March 24, 2015

MARCH MADNESS

Most of the snow in most of the country is gone. High school and college track teams are preparing for their upcoming seasons. The Boston Marathon is less than a month away. Marathon season is on the horizon for many competitors.

March is a frenetic month.

In many ways it is a month of evaluation. We begin to test ourselves. It is time to race again. Time to hit the track and see how much speed remains in our legs after a winter of slogging around.

Some runners have already turned a race or a few. This weekend, 28,000 runners participated in the Yuengling Shamrock Marathon and Half Marathon in Virginia Beach. Two weeks ago, on the west coast, 40,000 runners braved oven-like conditions at the Los Angeles Marathon.

It's time to break out and get crazy.

Spring is here and it's a time of renewal for us.

Time to set those goals for the new racing year, but more than that, it's time to work on ways to achieve those goals.

Here are a few suggestions.

--Assess your needs-Do you "die" in the last miles of your races? If so, work on your stamina. Add some miles to your week, but make them "quality" miles. Simply, run faster on your training runs. Add some hills to increase your stamina.

--Pete McGuirk passed me in the last mile again!--You need to get to the track! If you're getting outsprinted, you must work on your leg speed. Interval workouts are essential to successful racing, at any distance.

--Set up your business plan--I'm talking about the business of racing. If you're running a marathon in the spring, pour your efforts into that endeavor. After a month of recovery, it's time to refocus. Perhaps you should run a few 5K's during the summer, and then look at a fall marathon.

--Don't overrace--Quality, not quantity here.

--Enjoy the ride--Go on vacation. make sure you run while you're there, but during that week, have fun with the spouse and kids, relax, let things heal up, and return home rested and re-energized.

So, "March" into this season with renewed vigor and lofty goals.

You'll be "mad" if you don't.

www.muldowneyrunning.com